Eurilynne Anise Williams serves as assistant director and instructor of Academic Success & Bar Preparation (ASBP) at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University College of Law.  In this role, she assists with the administration and operations of the ASBP Department and aids in the design and implementation of course materials to enhance law student critical skills development, including orientation curriculum, and first year and upper-level student skill enhancement workshops.  She teaches the Introduction to Analytical Skills course and has also taught the Advanced Analytical Skills course.  Additionally, she teaches segments of the biannual bar examination preparedness workshops covering topics such as the Multistate Bar Exam (“MBE”), the Florida Essay Exam and the Multistate Performance Test (“MPT”). Professor Williams provides bar exam coaching for FAMU College of Law graduates participating in the Bar Exam Success Training (B.E.S.T.) Program for both the February and July administrations of the bar exam.

 

Professor Williams’ research interests include various aspects of effective engagement with underprepared and underperforming law students, strategies for enhancing law student writing, as well as topics centered in her areas of law practice.  She has presented at conferences hosted by the Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE) and the Legal Writing Institute (LWI).

 

Before joining the law school faculty, Professor Williams was a senior attorney with the State of Florida Guardian Ad Litem Program in the 18thJudicial Circuit. In prior years, she was in private practice, litigating cases primarily involving family law, guardianships, adoptions and dependency, and represented parents in dependency actions as an associate with the Office of Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsel, 5th District.

 

Professor Williams graduated cum laude with a Juris Doctor from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University College of Law where she served as business managing editor of Law Review and secretary of the Moot Court Board.  She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of West Florida.  Professor Williams is admitted to practice in Florida.

Courses taught by Professor Eurilynne Anise Williams:

  • Introduction to Analytical Skills I & II
  • Advanced Analytical Skills

2019

Professor Williams was invited to present at the Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE) 7thAnnual Conference to be held at Seattle University School of Law in Seattle, Washington in May 2019.  Professor Williams’ 30-minute interactive workshop entitled I’m Not a Therapist But I Play One on ASP-TV: Accepting the Counseling Role in Academic Support and Bar Preparationevaluates the counseling aspects of academic support and offers creative strategies for assisting students with stress management during law school and while preparing for the bar exam.  The workshop is designed to challenge ASP professionals to identify appropriate remedies to reduce anxiety in a variety of high-stress scenarios, and to collaborate to share effective, stress-reducing techniques.

2018

FAMU College of Law was represented at the Legal Writing Institute’s Annual One Day Workshop at the University of Tennessee on December 1, 2018, through the collaborative efforts of Professors Cynthia Ramkellawan, Eurilynne Williams, Paige Carlos and Marlese Wells. This year the Legal Writing Institute created the inaugural LWI Academic Support Committee and challenged law school faculty to reexamine the relationship between academic support, legal writing, and the bar exam.  The selected theme, Whose Job Is It Anyway?  Examining the Role of Legal Writing and Academic Support in Bar Preparation provided an excellent platform for highlighting the innovative collaborations taking place at FAMU COL.

 

The FAMU COL team developed a presentation entitled The Role of Legal Writing and Academic Support in Bar Preparation: Florida A&M University College of Law’s Doctrinal Crossover Case Study. The presentation emphasized the importance of (i) examining the pre-admission characteristics of Gen Z students and exploring methods for re-wiring them; (ii) assisting law students’ development during law school by providing context for critical skills in doctrinal subjects; and (iii) crossing the curricular lines to produce bar-exam-ready law school graduates.  The Doctrinal Crossover Case Study is a work in progress supported by the invaluable expertise of Professor Robert Abrams and his contributions in developing crossover writing exercises for first-year students.

Professor Eurilynne Williams and Professor Cynthia Ramkellawan represented the FAMU COL team at the workshop in Tennessee.

On Saturday, December 1, 2018, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign hosted one of the Legal Writing Institute’s One-Day Workshops. The selected theme, Legal Writing Across the Curriculum: Opportunities for Students to Write More Over Three Years of Law School inspired law faculty around the country to share their experiences and ideas for enhancing the writing quality of today’s law students.  FAMU College of Law was represented at this workshop through the collaborative efforts of Professors Paige Carlos, Cynthia Ramkellawan, Marlese Wells and Eurilynne Williams.  The team developed a presentation entitled Bridging the Gap: Using Writing Assessments and Feedback to Help Gen Z Students Transition Into Law School.  The presentation delved deeper into some of the defining traits of the current generation of law students and offered innovative solutions and suggestions designed to minimize the disconnect between immediacy and analytical thinking, with the ultimate goal of reducing the learning curve for Generation Z.  Additionally, solutions and suggestions were shared, targeting the importance of developing and cultivating writing skills throughout the entirety of the law student’s law school career in accordance with ABA Standards 303(a)(2) and 314.

Professor Paige Carlos represented the FAMU COL team at the workshop in Illinois.

2017

  • Professor Williams presented Looking Beyond the Grade: Exposing the Hidden Challenges of Underperforming Students at the Association of Academic Support Educators 2017 National Conference hosted by Texas A&M University School of Law in Fort Worth, Texas.  Each year, AASE sponsors a 3-day conference that provides academic support professionals from around the country the opportunity to work collectively to develop research-based teaching methods and design programs that enhance student learning to enable students to succeed in law school, on the bar exam, and in the practice of law. 

     

    Professor Williams’ presentation was an interactive workshop that explored techniques for assisting underperforming students with critical thinking, reading, and writing skill development.  Participants were given guidance in using a Cognition and Legal Analysis tool and a Self-Assessment calibration exercise to aid students in improving their performance on essays and multiple choice questions in the law school setting. Approximately 50 academic support professionals attended the session and many expressed their interest in incorporating Professor Williams’ ideas into their individual teaching and into the academic support programming at their law schools.

     

2016

  • Professor Williams presented Taking a Socratic Time-Out: Approaches to Motivating Underperforming, Upper-Level Students at the Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE) 2016 National Conference.  This conference was hosted by The City University of New York, CUNY Law School in Long Island City, New York. 

    Each year, AASE sponsors a 3-day conference that provides academic support professionals from around the country the opportunity to work collectively to develop research-based teaching methods and design programs that enhance student learning to enable students to succeed in law school, on the bar exam, and in the practice of law.  Professor Williams’ presentation emphasized the connection between educational psychology and teaching, the significance of identifying student motivators, and the effectiveness of implementing individualized motivational techniques to reengage underperforming law students both in and out of the classroom. 

  • Professor Williams presented Taking a Socratic Time-Out: Approaches to Motivating Underperforming, Upper-Level Students at the Association of Academic Support Educators (AASE) 2016 National Conference.  This conference was hosted by The City University of New York, CUNY Law School in Long Island City, New York. 

    Each year, AASE sponsors a 3-day conference that provides academic support professionals from around the country the opportunity to work collectively to develop research-based teaching methods and design programs that enhance student learning to enable students to succeed in law school, on the bar exam, and in the practice of law.  Professor Williams’ presentation emphasized the connection between educational psychology and teaching, the significance of identifying student motivators, and the effectiveness of implementing individualized motivational techniques to reengage underperforming law students both in and out of the classroom. 

2015

Professor Eurilynne Williams co-presented Accepting Kagan’s Challenge: Increasing Skill Development by Implementing a Focus-Driven Curriculum at the Legal Writing Institute One-Day Conference hosted here at the College of Law on December 4, 2015. Each December, the Legal Writing Institute sponsors one-day workshops in collaboration with law schools across the country. The theme of the FAMU conference was Preparing the Academically Unprepared Law Student.  Professor Williams, along with Professor Renee Allen, demonstrated how the academically underprepared student, as well as the student who academically underperforms, can benefit from curriculum mapping across the law school curriculum, collaboration between skill and doctrinal faculty members, and increased opportunities for written, skill development in upper-level courses.